Home Forums General Discussion Growing Body of Evidence Points to Infectious Causes for SD

This topic contains 13 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Maz 2 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #307567
    Maz
    Keymaster

    Just thought to post some studies pointing to infectious causes for SD – these mostly cover studies or case reports of folks with concomitant Lyme disease, Helicobacter Pylori and Toxoplasmosis. There are other suspected infectious causes, so this is by no means complete. Just hope it may help someone who is trying to present a case to their physician for help to begin abx therapy.

    It’s probably worthy of note that SD patients with Lyme may also be misdiagnosed and may actually have ACA (acrodermatitis chronicums atrophicans) or vice-versa as both skin manifestations can present similarly at times.

    Bacterial Infection as the Cause of Scleroderma: A Guide to Antibiotic Therapy

    http://www.missionsnet.org/?p=209

    Clinical pathologic correlations of Lyme disease by stage.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2847622

    Acute exacerbation of systemic scleroderma in Borrelia burgdorferi infection

    http://www.ingentaconnect.com/search/article?option1=tka&value1=Acute+exacerbation+of+systemic+scleroderma+in+Borrelia+burgdorferi+infection&pageSize=10&index=1

    Localized scleroderma unius lateri and Borrelia burgdoferi infection.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22565449

    Scleroderma linearis: hemiatrophia faciei progressiva (Parry-Romberg syndrom) without any changes in CNS and linear scleroderma “en coup de sabre” with CNS tumor.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19635150

    The expanding spectrum of cutaneous borreliosis.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19357623

    “Borrelia-associated early-onset morphea”: a particular type of scleroderma in childhood and adolescence with high titer antinuclear antibodies? Results of a cohort analysis and presentation of three cases.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19022534

    Morphoea: a manifestation of infection with Borrelia species?

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17941947

    [A late revealing of a case of tick-born borreliosis].

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17926497

    A morphealike skin condition caused by Borrelia burgdorferi in an immunocompromised patient.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16970224

    Is Helicobacter pylori infection a risk factor for disease severity in systemic sclerosis?

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23224499

    Helicobacter pylori may be a common denominator associated with systemic and multiple sclerosis.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21345710

    [Clinical picture of Lyme boreliosis].

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16886455

    Parry-Romberg syndrome: a possible association with borreliosis.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15009307

    Chronic borreliosis presenting with morphea- and lichen sclerosus et atrophicus-like cutaneous lesions. a case report.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11455165

    [Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in scleroderma circumscripta, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus, erythema nodosum, granuloma annulare, erythema annulare and chronic urticaria].

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10914463

    Infectious disease as aetiological factor in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21158008

    Evidence for Borrelia burgdorferi in morphea and lichen sclerosus.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10809977

    The outcome of Lyme borreliosis in children.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10446009

    Positive IgG Western blot for Borrelia burgdorferi in Colombia.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10666805

    Heterogeneity of Borrelia burgdorferi in the skin.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8989928

    Lymphoproliferative responses to Borrelia burgdorferi in circumscribed scleroderma.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8746343

    Helicobacter pylori infection and systemic sclerosis-is there a link?

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21145276

    Primary biliary cirrhosis-autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome concomitant with systemic sclerosis, immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19952485

    Reflux esophagitis and Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with scleroderma.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18797112

    Helicobacter pylori in patients with systemic sclerosis: detection with the 13C-urea breath test and eradication.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7817672

    The role of infections in the immunopathogensis of systemic sclerosis–evidence from serological studies.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19758208

    [Morphea associated with toxoplasmosis].

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14756079

    [Toxoplasma infection in scleroderma].

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/488826

    [Diffuse scleroderma in congenital toxoplasmosis].

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/583677

    Toxoplasmosis mimicking a brain abscess in an adult with treated scleroderma.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/804671

    [Scleroderma and diagnostic tests for toxoplasmosis].

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/5861456

    [IS THERE A RELATION BETWEEN SCLERODERMA AND TOXOPLASMOSIS?].

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14272389

    [Marked efficacy of metronidazole for the intestinal pseudoobstruction associated with systemic sclerosis].

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21372514

    A case of pseudoobstruction of the intestine associated with scleroderma dramatically responding to antibiotics.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16933011

    Ciprofloxacin for systemic scleroderma

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4035782/#!po=64.8148

    Severe, swift onset RA as a result of Lyme disease
    Current Meds: Biaxin (500mg BID), Tetracycline (500mg BID), Tirosint (88mcg), Liothyronine (10 mcg), Compounded Liposomal Artemisinin, LDN (3mg), Topical Progesterone,
    Current Supps: Curcumin, Bovine Colostrum, ALA. NAC, Milk Thistle, Super Liquid Folate/B12/B-Complex, Probiotics, Vit D3
    Supportive Measures: IV Myer's Cocktails, IV Glutathione, FIR Sauna, Gluten-free diet, Gym.

    #368441
    cavalier
    Participant

    Maz – I wish I had had these links with me yesterday as Dr C, had asked me for any links as to infection specifically Lyme being behind my having SD as a poss. causative factor. I supplied him with some doc’s who had made brief mentions of the correlation, but these would have been great to have given him as well.

    I may if OK with you print these off for him & fax or mail them to him.

    Jill SD Lyme CPn Candida & poss. bart.

    #368442
    Maz
    Keymaster

    @cavalier wrote:

    I may if OK with you print these off for him & fax or mail them to him.

    Jill, so glad they may be of help to you! 🙂 They are free study summaries, mostly on PubMed, so please feel free to pass Dr. C. the links or even just the link to the discussion thread here, where he’ll find them all listed. Sincerely hope they will be of some value in his treatments for you and others.

    There are many more…these were just a smattering as I worked my way back doing searches on PubMed.

    Severe, swift onset RA as a result of Lyme disease
    Current Meds: Biaxin (500mg BID), Tetracycline (500mg BID), Tirosint (88mcg), Liothyronine (10 mcg), Compounded Liposomal Artemisinin, LDN (3mg), Topical Progesterone,
    Current Supps: Curcumin, Bovine Colostrum, ALA. NAC, Milk Thistle, Super Liquid Folate/B12/B-Complex, Probiotics, Vit D3
    Supportive Measures: IV Myer's Cocktails, IV Glutathione, FIR Sauna, Gluten-free diet, Gym.

    #368443
    Maz
    Keymaster

    Just adding a couple of case studies reporting Lyme correlation in morphea and the second one in a case of both morphea and discoid lupus:

    “A boy with a tight skin: Borrelia-associated early-onset morphea.”

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24093617

    “Morphea with discoid lupus erythematosus.” NB Unfortunately, this young lady’s doctors questioned the diagnosis after a short course of doxy was administered.

    http://escholarship.org/uc/item/9nx710bz

    DermNet in New Zealand acknowledges correlation of morphea after exposures to tick bites

    http://www.dermnetnz.org/immune/morphoea.html

    Severe, swift onset RA as a result of Lyme disease
    Current Meds: Biaxin (500mg BID), Tetracycline (500mg BID), Tirosint (88mcg), Liothyronine (10 mcg), Compounded Liposomal Artemisinin, LDN (3mg), Topical Progesterone,
    Current Supps: Curcumin, Bovine Colostrum, ALA. NAC, Milk Thistle, Super Liquid Folate/B12/B-Complex, Probiotics, Vit D3
    Supportive Measures: IV Myer's Cocktails, IV Glutathione, FIR Sauna, Gluten-free diet, Gym.

    #368444
    JustDiagnosedChris
    Participant

    This is some great information Maz, I see this post is from a while back, have you added any more links to your “database” since then?

    #368445
    Maz
    Keymaster

    @justdiagnosedchris wrote:

    This is some great information Maz, I see this post is from a while back, have you added any more links to your “database” since then?

    Hi Chris,

    Yes, the first post has a bunch of studies I found online 1.5 years ago and just loaded them here for anyone interested. The post just above yours were just a few more I found by trawling through the web that ay, looking for any newer ones or anything I missed before. Sometimes, when I get a few spare mins, I get the urge to just look through studies for a particular rheumatic disease that ties or correlates infections to it. I’ll keep adding when I find more or if anyone else wants to add to this thread, please feel welcome to do so! It’s for everybody and anyone interested and is by no means a closed book or complete, as more and more research arises over time.

    Severe, swift onset RA as a result of Lyme disease
    Current Meds: Biaxin (500mg BID), Tetracycline (500mg BID), Tirosint (88mcg), Liothyronine (10 mcg), Compounded Liposomal Artemisinin, LDN (3mg), Topical Progesterone,
    Current Supps: Curcumin, Bovine Colostrum, ALA. NAC, Milk Thistle, Super Liquid Folate/B12/B-Complex, Probiotics, Vit D3
    Supportive Measures: IV Myer's Cocktails, IV Glutathione, FIR Sauna, Gluten-free diet, Gym.

    #368447
    kseevers
    Participant

    Hi Maz , your info is great Thank you ! I still haven’t convinced Michaels primary to change his AB yet. Do you know of some information Out there that discusses Lyme and it’s affects on muscles & tendons ?

    #368446
    Maz
    Keymaster

    @kseevers wrote:

    Hi Maz , your info is great Thank you ! I still haven’t convinced Michaels primary to change his AB yet. Do you know of some information Out there that discusses Lyme and it’s affects on muscles & tendons ?

    Hi Kathy,

    If you run some searches on pubmed.com you should find myriad studies using various key terms. Lyme is known to disseminate throughout the body (like syhphilis, a similar spirochete), causing trouble wherever it burrows:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=lyme+muscles+tendons

    “Spirochetes were multifocal in distribution, with a predilection for collagenous connective tissue of joints, heart, arteries, nerves, muscle, skin, and other tissues.”

    Even Steere, etal, said that even a few remaining spirochetes could wreak havoc, looking like inflammatory muscle and skin diseases, such as polymyositis and dermatomyositis in addition to SD:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2847622

    Bartonella has also been connected to tendon issues in the literature.

    Severe, swift onset RA as a result of Lyme disease
    Current Meds: Biaxin (500mg BID), Tetracycline (500mg BID), Tirosint (88mcg), Liothyronine (10 mcg), Compounded Liposomal Artemisinin, LDN (3mg), Topical Progesterone,
    Current Supps: Curcumin, Bovine Colostrum, ALA. NAC, Milk Thistle, Super Liquid Folate/B12/B-Complex, Probiotics, Vit D3
    Supportive Measures: IV Myer's Cocktails, IV Glutathione, FIR Sauna, Gluten-free diet, Gym.

    #368448
    Lynne G.SD
    Participant

    Hi K.
    I have info that I will send a bit later.Running like an idiot right now

    #368449
    Lynne G.SD
    Participant

    Hi K;
    Maybe this will say something to you.I know that if you Google Lyme and sore muscles that there is a lot of info as I had looked at that just a few months ago
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2725567

    #454564
    Staying Alive!
    Participant

    I cannot download any of the pubmed articles.
    Any suggestions??
    I am particularly interested in the correlation between Toxoplasmosis and Scleroderma which I have had for 35 years after contracting toxopplasmosis..
    Keen to start Minocycline protocol. Thought I would start low with 50mg three times a week. Dr has ordered Minocycline for me but is not aware of the protocols.

    CREST Scleroderma diagnosed 1982 ? after Toxoplasmosis infection (never treated). Recently developed Pulmonary Hypertension. Drugs Opsumit 10mg daily, Sildenafil 50mg 3x daily, Plavix 75mg daily, Doxycycline 100mg alternate days. Never taken immune-suppressants. Various supplements.

    #454572
    SJJ
    Participant

    Hi Maz,

    a while back i thought i saw a link that had lyme disease attacking collage (chondritis or polychondritis) but I can’t seem to find it even when i do a search. do you happen to remember where you found it? thanks a bunch….you are such a wealth of info and support!

    #454576
    Maz
    Keymaster

    I cannot download any of the pubmed articles.
    Any suggestions??
    I am particularly interested in the correlation between Toxoplasmosis and Scleroderma which I have had for 35 years after contracting toxopplasmosis..
    Keen to start Minocycline protocol. Thought I would start low with 50mg three times a week. Dr has ordered Minocycline for me but is not aware of the protocols.

    Hi Staying Alive,

    If you print out the Pub Med pages on Toxoplasmosis where summaries are blank, your doc may be able to access the full journal articles. Alternatively, the journal in which the study or article is published is usually listed above the PubMed article as a live link. Sometimes PubMed doesn’t publish the summary, but you can find a few lines in the actual journal.

    As for dosing for toxoplasmosis, you might want to think about protocol and dosing in a different way from the low dose pulsed method that is used for mycoplasma. Toxoplasma is a protozoan parasitic infection, unlike mycoplasma that is a cell-wall deficient intracellular organism that is slow-growing and doesn’t require daily dosing. The last thing you want to do is undertreat an infection, because this can cause resistance issues. So, determining appropriate antibiotics and dosing protocols will be quite important in this context. Different approaches are used for active and latent infections, too. Wiki has a little spiel on this under the Treatment heading:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toxoplasmosis

    Of course, with SD minocycline (tetraclines have anti-protozoal effects, which is why doxy is a prophylactic for Malaria) is the core therapy, because it is just so wonderful for its immune-modulation effects, in addition to working so well for intracellular pathogens. So, keeping it as a core therapy, perhaps in addition to clindamycin IVs, might be a decent protocol to try, although my best fellow patient insight would be to talk with your doc and consider daily oral minocycline as was done in the Minocycline in Early Diffuse SD trials run by Dr. Trentham. He started patients on 100mg daily for the first month and then upped the dose to 100mg twice daily after that. Treatment with oral minocycline for SD (whatever else is used to treat co-existing infections) is usually for life, though once remission is achieved, a trial of lower dosing is sometimes tried to see if remission can be maintained.

    Hope that might help, Staying Alive?

    Thanks for posting here…it’s reminded me to try to do some more rummaging around to look for more recent studies in this ever-growing body of evidence for infectious causes for SD!

    Severe, swift onset RA as a result of Lyme disease
    Current Meds: Biaxin (500mg BID), Tetracycline (500mg BID), Tirosint (88mcg), Liothyronine (10 mcg), Compounded Liposomal Artemisinin, LDN (3mg), Topical Progesterone,
    Current Supps: Curcumin, Bovine Colostrum, ALA. NAC, Milk Thistle, Super Liquid Folate/B12/B-Complex, Probiotics, Vit D3
    Supportive Measures: IV Myer's Cocktails, IV Glutathione, FIR Sauna, Gluten-free diet, Gym.

    #454577
    Maz
    Keymaster

    Hi Maz,

    a while back i thought i saw a link that had lyme disease attacking collage (chondritis or polychondritis) but I can’t seem to find it even when i do a search. do you happen to remember where you found it?

    Hi SJJ,

    Was it a link to these articles? No summaries for these case reports unfortunately, though.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=lyme%20polychondritis

    Severe, swift onset RA as a result of Lyme disease
    Current Meds: Biaxin (500mg BID), Tetracycline (500mg BID), Tirosint (88mcg), Liothyronine (10 mcg), Compounded Liposomal Artemisinin, LDN (3mg), Topical Progesterone,
    Current Supps: Curcumin, Bovine Colostrum, ALA. NAC, Milk Thistle, Super Liquid Folate/B12/B-Complex, Probiotics, Vit D3
    Supportive Measures: IV Myer's Cocktails, IV Glutathione, FIR Sauna, Gluten-free diet, Gym.

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