Home Forums General Discussion Vitamin D and calcium

This topic contains 19 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Linda L 2 years, 10 months ago.

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  • #308601
    Anonymous
    Participant

    “Vitamin K2 and the Calcium Paradox: How a little-Known Vitamin could save your life” – the book by Kate Rheaume-Bleue published in August 2013.
    “New research shows that taking vitamin D and calcium supplements for bone health actually increases the risk of heart attack and stroke, because the added calcium builds up in arteries.The secret to keeping bones strong and arteries clear is vitamin K2. Traditionally we used to get ample quantities of vitamin K2 when people were consuming grass-fed animals. Grain-based animal feed contributes to the eradiction of vitamin K2. Without vitamin K2 the body cannot direct calcium to the bones where it is needed – instead the calcium resides in soft tissue /like the arteries/ leading to a combination of osteoporosis and atherosclerosis. Taking calcium and vitamin D without the addition of vitamin K2 could prove dangerous.”

    Linda L.

    #374176
    A Friend
    Participant

    @linda L wrote:

    “Vitamin K2 and the Calcium Paradox: How a little-Known Vitamin could save your life” – the book by Kate Rheaume-Bleue published in August 2013.
    “New research shows that taking vitamin D and calcium supplements for bone health actually increases the risk of heart attack and stroke, because the added calcium builds up in arteries.The secret to keeping bones strong and arteries clear is vitamin K2. Traditionally we used to get ample quantities of vitamin K2 when people were consuming grass-fed animals. Grain-based animal feed contributes to the eradiction of vitamin K2. Without vitamin K2 the body cannot direct calcium to the bones where it is needed – instead the calcium resides in soft tissue /like the arteries/ leading to a combination of osteoporosis and atherosclerosis. Taking calcium and vitamin D without the addition of vitamin K2 could prove dangerous.”

    Linda L.

    EDIT: I re-read the link I posted below again (it’s in a Word doc on my PC). A part of it I thought was worth pointing out again:
    Vitamin K2 is also a powerful antioxidant, and as such can prevent a range of health problems, including cancer and obesity. The antioxidants in vitamin K2 can help prevent free radical damage inside your body, to slow the signs of aging.

    Sources of Vitamin K2

    Recent research has overturned the old notion that humans don’t need dietary sources of vitamin K2. In fact, we all need adequate levels of vitamin K2 in our diets. Fermented foods, like cheese, soy tempeh, natto (a traditional Japanese soy food) and sauerkraut are all good sources of vitamin K2. Other sources include chicken breasts and livers, ground beef, egg yolk and butter. Butter made from organic, free range milk is highest in vitamin K2.
    END OF QUOTED MATERIAL IN THIS EDIT
    AF

    Hello Linda L,
    I had not been to the board in several days, and decided to take a peek at what was going on. Your post caught my eye. The very same subject matter you posted about was of interest to me a few years ago. (I may have first read about this in an article on ArthritisTrust.org under Important Articles). At any rate, at the time, I felt it was very important for myself that I include K-2 in my supplements, and have since that time.

    Some items saved into a document on my PC shows some other links/info:

    http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/vitamins-minerals/the-function-of-vitamin-k2.html
    Another link

    #374177
    richie
    Participant

    HI AF –Being from the east -what good is sauerkraut without a bun and a big fat hot dog –now thats good —aside of that I do like sauerkraut and I was aware of the benefits —
    richie

    #374178
    A Friend
    Participant

    @richie wrote:

    HI AF –Being from the east -what good is sauerkraut without a bun and a big fat hot dog –now thats good —aside of that I do like sauerkraut and I was aware of the benefits —
    richie

    Hi Richie,

    My answer(s) to your question about sauerkraut without a bun and a big fat hot dog is: I never had it that way, but my grandmother made her home with us when I was young, and she made a churn full of sauerkraut in those days. I had not a clue how healthful it was.

    Then when this southern girl traveled to Wisconsin one year, she learned how wonderful a Reubin Sandwich was. My husband and I both loved them and I improvised and began making them at home.

    Lay out all the ingredients for the sandwiches, (plus have some softened butter ready)
    put a large non-stick skillet on very low heat
    and then put the following sandwich together:

    Two slices of Jewish Rye Bread, spread with a mixture of mayonnaise and mustard.
    On one slice of the bread, put a piece of Swiss cheese,
    then add thin layers of spicy corned beef or other seasoned/spicy roast beef,
    add a layer of well-drained sauerkraut,
    then add another slice of Swiss cheese, and
    put the other slice of bread with the mayo/mustard on top, face-down on the sandwich.

    Spread softened butter lightly on both sides of the bread, and brown to golden color on each side in the medium hot skillet.

    A Kosher dill pickle, along with some crispy baked chips of some kind! Delicious!

    Richie, think you can handle that???? And, if you haven’t tried Bubbies Sauerkraut from the health store refrigerated section, it is quite a healthy treat I discovered a year ago.

    Good to talk with you, old friend!

    AF

    #374179
    richie
    Participant

    I think I would have to sleep elevated as the reflux is sure to kick up –but it sounds absolutely sensational !!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Best always and all the best for the holidays –Richie

    #374180
    Anonymous
    Participant

    A Friend,
    I cannot believe it! On the street I used to visit frequently, they started to serve exactly the same sandwiches some years ago. I loved them, especially that sauerkraut inside.
    There are two kinds of sauerkraut in the shops. Most common is the one with white vinegar and this one is not good. It looks white. The white vinegar destroys red blood cells and worsens digestion. The other one looks yellow and becomes more and more yellow with time. This one has gone through a natural milk fermentation. It has many vitamins like C, B and E and also good bacteria like Lactobacillus and other.
    AF and Richie, do you take vitamin K2 in tablets as well?
    Linda L.

    #374181
    A Friend
    Participant

    @linda L wrote:

    A Friend,
    I cannot believe it! On the street I used to visit frequently, they started to serve exactly the same sandwiches some years ago. I loved them, especially that sauerkraut inside.
    There are two kinds of sauerkraut in the shops. Most common is the one with white vinegar and this one is not good. It looks white. The white vinegar destroys red blood cells and worsens digestion. The other one looks yellow and becomes more and more yellow with time. This one has gone through a natural milk fermentation. It has many vitamins like C, B and E and also good bacteria like Lactobacillus and other.
    AF and Richie, do you take vitamin K2 in tablets as well?
    Linda L.

    Hi Linda L,
    If you scroll down under my AF signature, you will see in the list of supplements, etc. that K-2 is listed…. I added it a few years ago after reading about what it does and how important it is. In newer reading about sauerkraut and K-2, sauerkraut is said to be one of the best sources of it — but believe that some methods of making it are superior to others. Since I don’t eat sauerkraut often (and didn’t know about it being high in K-2 until recently, I will continue to take the K-2 supplements. (Am thinking I may have pasted the following links/references already, but can’t remember at the moment… so am doing it again:

    http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/vitamins-minerals/the-function-of-vitamin-k2.html
    Another link

    #374182
    Anonymous
    Participant

    Thanks A Friend. I have found the information that the richest source of vitamin K2 is the Japanese food natto,also fermented, but I don’t know anything about it and if it is safe. So I will stick to the sauerkraut and tablets.
    Best wishes,
    Linda L.

    #374183
    A Friend
    Participant

    More recent information on this subject accidentally found that seems worth our reading:
    http://vitamink2.org/
    AF

    #374184
    Anonymous
    Participant

    AnotheDonate My accountMy basketRegisterContact us Arthritis news Press releases Vitamin K2 ‘may help prevent and treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women’ Published on 17 December 2014 A new analysis of existing research has indicated that vitamin K2 might have a role to play in preventing and treating osteoporosis in postmenopausal women.Carried out by Chinese researchers at Hangzhou Xiasha Hospital and Zhejiang University, the study conducted a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials to ascertain if vitamin K2 can be useful in this capacity. This link is accepted in the Japanese research community, but has not been confirmed in Western countries.As such, the team searched the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase and ISI databases, identifying a total of 19 studies – encompassing 6,759 participants – that met the inclusion criteria.Findings published in the medical journal Osteoporosis International revealed that postmenopausal women with osteoporosis experienced significant improvements in terms of vertebral bone mineral density for both medium and long-term results when taking vitamin K2. However, no significant difference in bone density changes was noted for the non-osteoporosis subgroup analysis.In terms of fracture incidence, pooled analysis of the seven related studies demonstrated no significant difference favouring vitamin K2, but significant differences were found in undercarboxylated osteocalcin reduction and osteocalcin increment. Further analysis showed that the vitamin K2 group seemed to have a higher adverse reaction rate.The researchers said their analysis supports the hypothesis that the vitamin plays “a role in the maintenance and improvement of vertebral bone mineral density and the prevention of fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis … However, the effect of vitamin K2 for postmenopausal women without osteoporosis had not been identified”.They added: “Further high-quality randomised controlled trials with large sample sizes are needed to confirm the role of vitamin K2 in osteoporosis for postmenopausal women.”A spokeswoman welcomed the findings, but added: “Until we know more about the role of vitamin K2 , we’d suggest that those people at risk of osteoporosis, such as postmenopausal women, make sure they get plenty of calcium and vitamin D through diet, exposure to sunlight, and weight-bearing exercise.” – See more at: http://www.arthritisresearchuk.org/news/general-news/vitamin-k2-may-help-prevent-and-treat-osteoporosis-in-postmenopausal-women.aspx#sthash.fDonFBw8.dpufr article about K2 published in UK in December..

    #374185
    1Aggie
    Participant

    Is it ok to take vit k if you have thick blood? I have to take aspirin and am surprised I was not advised to be on Coumadin or the like as I have borderline syndrome that can cause women to miscarry or have strokes. I forgot what it is called or what the factor was that was positive in my blood tests. I am wondering if that would be safe to supplement with this condition.

    Dx with CREST 2/08. minocycline 2x/day M-F, LDN 3mg nightly, 90 mg of Armour thyroid. Probiotics, milk thistle, L-argine, L-lysine, natto + serro, 81mg baby aspirin, daily multiple, 1000mg Vit C, lutein, cinnamon extract, evening primrose oil, omega 3s, Ubiquinol 100mg, alpha lipoic acid and exercise when I can.

    #374186
    A Friend
    Participant

    @linda L wrote:

    “Vitamin K2 and the Calcium Paradox: How a little-Known Vitamin could save your life” – the book by Kate Rheaume-Bleue published in August 2013.
    “New research shows that taking vitamin D and calcium supplements for bone health actually increases the risk of heart attack and stroke, because the added calcium builds up in arteries.The secret to keeping bones strong and arteries clear is vitamin K2. Traditionally we used to get ample quantities of vitamin K2 when people were consuming grass-fed animals. Grain-based animal feed contributes to the eradiction of vitamin K2. Without vitamin K2 the body cannot direct calcium to the bones where it is needed – instead the calcium resides in soft tissue /like the arteries/ leading to a combination of osteoporosis and atherosclerosis. Taking calcium and vitamin D without the addition of vitamin K2 could prove dangerous.” Linda L

    Hi Linda L,
    I was re-reading earlier today from a saved document about Osteoporosis. It is such a good one (and includes needed co-supplements for it). I decided to do a search on Board topics to see if info found might fit well in a recent osteoporosis topic — and saw yours. [Then I had to laugh a bit, for Richie, I, and a couple of others deflected the attention your post deserved with our joking and nonsense about the sauerkraut and Reuben sandwich.] Your K-2 info was “right-on” — and I believe so is the information I discovered again about other needed/necessary supplements for osteoporosis — the main focus today is to share what is written about the necessity for magnesium also to be included for treating bone problems.

    This is a link to information about magnesium being necessary, along with other minerals when calcium is taken; and if not taken, the others may cause more harm than good. Sounds like a necessary balancing act we need to know more about. http://mdschoice.com/articles/research_magnesium_osteoporosis.php

    Linda, hope we’re forgiven for our previously de-railing your good post during the Christmas season…

    Best,
    AF

    #374187
    A Friend
    Participant

    @1aggie wrote:

    Is it ok to take vit k if you have thick blood? I have to take aspirin and am surprised I was not advised to be on Coumadin or the like as I have borderline syndrome that can cause women to miscarry or have strokes. I forgot what it is called or what the factor was that was positive in my blood tests. I am wondering if that would be safe to supplement with this condition.

    1Aggie,
    Just read your post. In some of the reading done today, I read something about cautions about taking Vitamin K and/or other things. I believe the source I read this from was related to physicians’ input. If I were in your place, I would make sure to find, read, learn everything about this subject. (It’s one thing to ask our physicians, but it is also very important that we learn about this — and even keep a copy of important information such as this — in our own files… lest we forget in the future and need to review the information.) I will be on the lookout for it, and let you know if I locate it. Take care!
    AF

    #374188
    ginger1957
    Participant

    people who are looking for vitamin K should take a look at Kale. 1 cup of Kale is packed with 130% of daily recommended allowances on vitamin C and K. Also noted in the same info 1 cup of Kale contains 2.9 grams of protein and a healthy dose of potassium,iron,calcium and omega 3 fatty acids. Hope this helps

    #374189
    vinny
    Participant

    There is long thread on the calcium/K2/vit.D relationship on http://www.inspire/groups/talk-psoriasis
    The website is devoted to psoriasis and the accompanied arthritis. The thread is entitled “….and his jaw dropped!” The tread has over 800 entries, but the early ones have the meat of the research.

    Psoriatic Arthritis: 250mg Azithromycin tue,thur,sat; Plaquenil 200mg daily; 100mg Minocycline TABLET M,W,F; Doxycycline 100mg Tue, thur, sat, sun; twice daily 400mg Pentoxifylline;100mcg Levotyroxine; 4mg LDN at bedtime. Have been using some level of Minocycline since 2008

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