Home Forums General Discussion Knee pain/Thigh Pain

This topic contains 19 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  Krys 4 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #359481
    Jan Lucinda1
    Participant

    @A Friend wrote:

    @Joe M wrote:

    Hi,

    I would like to give you some facts regarding the ph levels in your body.

    Your body has several built-in mechanisms that tightly regulate your plasma ph, intracellular fluid ph, and extracellular fluid ph. Any attempt to alter your fluid ph levels will immediately be offset by these mechanisms. The three main built in mechanisms that keep your plasma ph tightly regulated are:

    1. Buffer Systems:
    Carbonic Acid-Bicarbonate Buffer System
    Protein Buffer System
    Phosphate Buffer System
    2. Exhalation of carbon dioxide (yes, simply by breathing your body regulates plasma ph.)
    3. Elimination of hydrogen ions via the kidneys

    I am studying this.

    Saliva and urine ph levels are complete independent of plasma, intracellular, and extracellular fluid ph levels. Urine ph is based largely on what you’ve eaten lately, and saliva ph is normally slightly acidic to aid in digestion. What does measuring your urine and saliva ph tell you? It tells you the ph level of your urine and saliva. It has nothing to do with the critical ph of your cellular fluids and plasma.

    The cells in your body undergo millions of chemical reactions in order to function normally, many of which NATURALLY produce acid by-products. When they do, the three mechanisms listed above immediately kick into action so plasma in cellular fluid ph stays in the very narrow range between 7.35 and 7.45. You have no control over these mechanisms, except for holding your breath, and even then you will pass out if you hold it too long, which is the body’s way of telling you not to hold your breath that long!

    I realize there are many websites that promote attempting to alkalize the body. They are easy enough to find. I can’t post any because I believe it is against board policy to post links. What you will usually find on these sites are undocumented claims and products for sale, including books and tons of supplements. In my opinion, if you want to find these facts for yourself, avoid any websites that are selling books or supplements, and try to find a basic physiology website that explains it all without the wild claims. If you do the research and are convinced “acidosis” is the cause of all disease, as some of these websites claim, your best bet is to simply eat a healthy diet. Good advice for anyone and almost guaranteed to make you feel better!

    JM

    @Joe M wrote:

    Hi,

    I would like to give you some facts regarding the ph levels in your body.

    Your body has several built-in mechanisms that tightly regulate your plasma ph, intracellular fluid ph, and extracellular fluid ph. Any attempt to alter your fluid ph levels will immediately be offset by these mechanisms. The three main built in mechanisms that keep your plasma ph tightly regulated are:

    AF replies:

    As it is sometimes confusing, please note my reply is addressed to Joe M

    #359482
    A Friend
    Participant
    Joe M wrote:
    Hi,

    I would like to give you some facts regarding the ph levels in your body.

    Your body has several built-in mechanisms that tightly regulate your plasma ph, intracellular fluid ph, and extracellular fluid ph. Any attempt to alter your fluid ph levels will immediately be offset by these mechanisms. The three main built in mechanisms that keep your plasma ph tightly regulated are:

    AF replies:

    As it is sometimes confusing, please note my reply is addressed to Joe M

    #359483
    Krys
    Participant

    AF, thank you for bringing acidity back to the front again!

    I came upon an intriguing quote about acidity which a bit undermines my past understanding. Have you come across such figures anywhere?

    Morning urine is generally more acidic than mid-day urine, and pH also changes in response to diet – in general foods like meats, coffee, alcohol, eggs and beans make the body more acidic while most fruits and vegetables have an alkaline effect. (see Appendix for a more complete listing of acid/alkaline foods). (..)

    The ideal pH range of saliva is about 6.4 – 7.2, (below 6.4 is too acidic, above 7.2 is too alkaline). Saliva usually becomes more alkaline after eating and with vegetarian diet.
    Urine pH ideally should vary from approximately 5.0 (acid in the morning) to 8.0 (alkaline at night) during each 24-hour period.
    ” – p. 174-175 Martha Christy “Your Own Perfect Medicine”

    I understand from the quote above that one should always test both saliva and urine, both in the morning and at night, to have a clear picture.
    So does it mean that our morning testing, without measuring the evening one, has got no value at all in assessing the acidity of our body?

    I remember being depressed about how no matter how many green juices and vegetables I ate the previous day, my morning urine acidity was always 5.5 – 5.8. I rarely checked the night acidity and did it only after big amounts of green juicing. The evening number never went above 6.6, so I was acidic even by Martha Christy’s scale.

    Have you ever come across specific numbers for morning and evening acidity?
    Krys

    #359484
    Valsmum
    Participant

    I bought some of the ph strips to test saliva. I was glad to see all my family members were in normal range, so glad they are all healthy. Mine was slightly acidic, but not too bad.

    Thanks for posting what you have learned Afriend.

    take care!

    #359485
    Krys
    Participant

    @krys wrote:

    The ideal pH range of saliva is about 6.4 – 7.2, (below 6.4 is too acidic, above 7.2 is too alkaline). Saliva usually becomes more alkaline after eating and with vegetarian diet.
    Urine pH ideally should vary from approximately 5.0 (acid in the morning) to 8.0 (alkaline at night) during each 24-hour period.
    ” – p. 174-175 Martha Christy “Your Own Perfect Medicine”

    While reading notes from “The 8th International Alternative Medicine Conference” today http://www.betterhealthguy.com/yu-conference
    I found a bit more on interpreting morning urine pH:
    From the lecture by Jeffery Marrongelle DC on “Foundational Physiology and Improving Patient Outcome”:
    Suggested six key biomarkers that are valuable in assessing health status: Hemoglobin A1C, Homocysteine, hs-CRP, vitamin D, first morning urine pH, oxidized LDL/HDL and 8-Oxoguanine.
    For 1st morning urine, 5-6.5 will wear you out, 6.5-7.5 is best, 7.5-8 is a concern.

    I guess both opinions are right. The first one gives a more complete picture as it asks you to take into account morning and evening saliva pH AND morning and evening urine pH, and make an assessment on the basis of all 4 readings carried out for more than one day. If the detoxification pathways are working right, morning urine pH can be very low (toxins are acidic) but maybe in a non acidic person it will bounce up to normal as the day progresses?
    I hope the number range will be helpful to someone.
    Krys

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